The Insider’s Guide to…Running Lingo

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When was the last time you found yourself engaged in a conversation with one of your super-fit friends, only to find yourself scratching your head about the weird words they were using? “You were doing fart…what?

Well, have no fear—we’ve got your back. We’ve searched far and wide to find the most out there terms and, with a little help from our in-house experts, we put together a list of our favorites.

We’ll be sharing these insider terms to have you talking the talk in no time, regardless of the workout you’re into.

This time, we take on…running lingo:

Fartleks

Contrary to what you might be thinking, doing fartleks on your run will not offend bystanders. Fartlek, or “speed play” in Swedish, comes from joining the words “fart” meaning speed” and “lek” meaning play. It combines periods of fast running intermixed with periods of slower running. Fun fact: at our HQ in Denmark, we’d call them Fartleg.

Rabbit

Not only is the rabbit your fastest lap on any given workout, a rabbit is also a runner who sets the pace during a race. The rest of the field chases them down, hence the term rabbit.

Pronation

This refers to the way the foot strikes the ground while running. If you overpronate, your foot rolls in while you run, whereas if your foot rolls out, you’re most likely an underpronator. The best way to correct either scenario is to get a gait analysis where you can get fitted properly.

Newbie

These are the beginners, often learns the basics of the sport by training for a short race covering just a few km/miles. Our 5k training plan is a great place to start – if you haven’t already started one, go ahead and give it a shot so you can ditch the newbie name!

Streaker

A streaker is a runner who runs consecutively every day over a long period of time. We’re assuming most of them run with their clothes on, but hey—minimalism is in!

Hitting the Wall

As the name implies, hitting the wall is the feeling that sets in when you’re reaching your absolute limit during a run. Persistence can help you push through the wall and set a new limit for yourself.

DOMS

This ominous-sounding acronym stands for delayed-onset muscle soreness, which usually sets in about a day or two after a run, and can make even basic workouts a challenge when it strikes. Beware the DOMS!

VO2 Max

Also known as aerobic capacity, VO2 Max is the body’s maximum oxygen intake. Though our genes are likely responsible for most of our VO2 max capacity, research indicates runners may be able to increase it with more intense training sessions, such as doing intervals at a high pace for about 5 minutes.

Bonus: Endorphin

Endorphins are the awesome hormones which act as neurotransmitters responsible for the runner’s high many of you may experience after especially strenuous running workouts. The origin of the word is actually a combination of “endo” meaning inside, and “phine”, from morphine (since they alleviate pain), so in essence, “the morphine within”.

Free your endorphins!
The Endomondo Team

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